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The Owl’s Eyes

Postmillennialism —  Leave a comment

(Note: From time-to-time I will post interesting facts about God’s creation. This is one of those times!)

Of all an Owl’s features, perhaps the most striking is its eyes. Large and forward facing, they may account for one to five percent of the Owl’s body weight, depending on species.

The forward facing aspect of the eyes that give an Owl its “wise” appearance, also give it a wide range of “binocular” vision (seeing an object with both eyes at the same time). This means the owl can see objects in 3 dimensions (height, width, and depth), and can judge distances in a similar way to humans. The field of view for an owl is about 110 degrees, with about 70 degrees being binocular vision.

By comparison, humans have a field of view that covers 180 degrees, with 140 degrees being binocular. A woodcock has an amazing 360 degree field of view, because its eyes are on the side of its head. However, less than 10 degrees of this is binocular.

An Owl’s eyes are large in order to improve their efficiency, especially under low light conditions. In fact, the eyes are so well developed, that they are not eye balls as such, but elongated tubes. They are held in place by bony structures in the skull called Sclerotic rings. For this reason, an Owl cannot “roll” or move its eyes – that is, it can only look straight ahead!

The Owl more than makes up for this by being able to turn its head up to 270 degrees left or right from the forward facing position, and almost upside down. There are several adaptations that allow this, outlined in the Owl Skeletal system article.

Continue Reading on www.owlpages.com
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