Archives For Revelation

When we approach the Book of Revelation, we must do so with fear and trembling. It has conquered many a strong scholar. Some have likened Revelation to a black hole: It is so dense that light cannot escape from it. This is strange in that it is actually called a “revelation,” i.e., unveiling, opening. Because […]

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The Book of Revelation is perhaps the best known prophetic work in the Bible. It is filled with war and judgment, which many use to show that Revelation undermines the optimistic postmillennial hope. Yet Revelation can only be employed against postmillennialism if it is misinterpreted. And the usual misinterpretation arises the moment one opens Revelation, […]

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Contrary to popular opinion, Revelation does not undermine the postmillennial hope — despite its enormous judgments. And this is mainly because it is prophesying events to occur soon. John uses two terms when he speaks of his temporal expectation: “shortly” (Gk., en tachei) and “near” (Gk., engus). If for some reason his original audience could […]

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I believe that Revelation deals with Christ’s judgment-coming against Israel for crucifying Christ. This view is known as the preterist approach to Revelation. More specifically, I distinguish it as “redemptive-historical preterism,” in that it focuses on redemptive history rather than secular history. Redemptive-historical preterism looks at John’s prophecy as having mostly occurred (“preterist” is based on the Latin […]

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The famous number 666 cannot possibly be interpreted as some kind of three-fold failure of man (body, soul & spirit represented by 6) to reach the three-fold perfection of God (Father, Son & Holy Spirit represented by 7). My point is that those who argue for this interpretation (or interpretations like it) have made a […]

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The postmillennial preterist argues that John uses 666 as a reference to Nero Caesar, and not to some future Antichrist who reduces the world to terror. But dispensationalists often challenge this interpretation with the following question: “Since Irenaeus is one of the earliest sources to refer to the number 66, why did he not know […]

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Preteristic postmillennialism argues that the great catastrophes of Revelation occurred before the temple destroyed, which removes Revelation as an objection to the eventual growth and dominance of the gospel. One argument for the early date is based on Revelation 11:1–2: Then there was given me a  measuring rod like a staff;  and  someone said, “Get […]

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