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DISPENSATIONAL OBJECTIONS THAT POSTMILLENNIALISM CAN’T ANSWER

Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. —  3 Comments

 

 

 

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Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

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Ken is a Presbyterian pastor and the author or co-author of over thirty books, most on eschatology. He has been married since 1971, and has three children and several grandchildren. He is a graduate of Tennessee Temple University (B.A., 1973), Reformed Theological Seminary (M.Div., 1977), and Whitefield Theological Seminary (Th.M., 1986; Th.D., 1988). He currently pastors Living Hope Presbyterian Church (affiliated with the RPCGA) in Greer, SC. Much of his writing is in the field of eschatology, including his 600 page book, He Shall Have Dominion: A Postmillennial Eschatology and his 400 page, Before Jerusalem Fell: Dating the Book of Revelation (his Th.D. dissertation). He contributed chapters to two Zondervan CounterPoints books on eschatological issues: Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond (edited by Darrell L. Bock) and Four Views on the Book of Revelation (edited by C. Marvin Pate). He also debated Thomas D. Ice in Kregel's The Great Tribulation: Past or Future? His books have been published by American Vision, Baker, Zondervan, Kregel, P & R, Greenhaven Press, Nordskog, Wipf & Stock, and several other publishers. He has published scores of articles in such publications as Tabletalk, Westminster Theological Journal, Evangelical Theological Society Journal, Banner of Truth, Christianity Today, Antithesis, Contra Mundum, and others. He has spoken at over 100 conferences in America, the Caribbean, and Australia. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society and a Church Council Committee member of Coalition on Revival.

3 responses to DISPENSATIONAL OBJECTIONS THAT POSTMILLENNIALISM CAN’T ANSWER

  1. Ha, ha. One of the greatest posts yet!

    A question about post millennialism that I haven’t heard answered: Christ says that his Kingdom is not of this world, but postmill’s believe that it is. How do you reconcile these two ideas?

    Thanks

    • Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. May 14, 2012 at 6:30

      The kingdom’s SOURCE (Greek preposition here is ek, “out of”) is not from this world, but from above. If this meant Christ’s kingdom was not in any way involved in this world, this would do away with all millennial views — including premillennialism’s earthly, political kingdom. What Christ is saying is that his kingdom does not derive from this world as does Pilate’s (Rome’s) kingdom. Otherwise, it would have to field an army to fight the opposition, as does Rome.

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