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COVENANTALISM DECLINE AND POSTMILLENNIALISM

Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. —  August 2, 2012 — 5 Comments

The various divine covenants are “the covenants of the promise” (Eph 2:12). The covenant concept runs throughout Scripture. It frames God’s creational process, structures his dealings with man, and, most importantly for this book’s thesis, insures his divine program’s success in history. This program is not about the defeat of Christ’s redemptive work in history. The gospel of salvation, the building of His church, and the establishment of his comprehensive, worldwide kingdom lead to Christendom and the victory of the faith over all opposition.

Many people point out that postmillennialism had declined in adherence since its heyday from 1700 through the early 1900s. But this is not so much because of a direct decline in postmillennialism per se as it is a decline in theology in general. And particularly in covenantal theology. Covenantal theology’s decline in the late nineteenth century leads to the decline of postmillennialism in the twentieth century. This had the sad effect of leading to a decline of Christian influence in society. Postmillennialism is fundamentally covenantal, presenting a full-orbed Christianity in its pristine authority and power. The specific covenants of the Old and New Testaments support the postmillennial position.

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Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

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Ken is a Presbyterian pastor and the author or co-author of over thirty books, most on eschatology. He has been married since 1971, and has three children and several grandchildren. He is a graduate of Tennessee Temple University (B.A., 1973), Reformed Theological Seminary (M.Div., 1977), and Whitefield Theological Seminary (Th.M., 1986; Th.D., 1988). He currently pastors Living Hope Presbyterian Church (affiliated with the RPCGA) in Greer, SC. Much of his writing is in the field of eschatology, including his 600 page book, He Shall Have Dominion: A Postmillennial Eschatology and his 400 page, Before Jerusalem Fell: Dating the Book of Revelation (his Th.D. dissertation). He contributed chapters to two Zondervan CounterPoints books on eschatological issues: Three Views on the Millennium and Beyond (edited by Darrell L. Bock) and Four Views on the Book of Revelation (edited by C. Marvin Pate). He also debated Thomas D. Ice in Kregel's The Great Tribulation: Past or Future? His books have been published by American Vision, Baker, Zondervan, Kregel, P & R, Greenhaven Press, Nordskog, Wipf & Stock, and several other publishers. He has published scores of articles in such publications as Tabletalk, Westminster Theological Journal, Evangelical Theological Society Journal, Banner of Truth, Christianity Today, Antithesis, Contra Mundum, and others. He has spoken at over 100 conferences in America, the Caribbean, and Australia. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society and a Church Council Committee member of Coalition on Revival.

5 responses to COVENANTALISM DECLINE AND POSTMILLENNIALISM

  1. Hector Falcon August 3, 2012 at 6:30

    Which of your books are you referring to in the article?

    • Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. August 3, 2012 at 6:30

      Hector: I don’t see any reference to one of my books… ???

      • Steve Johnson August 3, 2012 at 6:30

        I think Hector is referring to this “It frames God’s creational process, structures his dealings with man, and, most importantly for this book’s thesis, insures his divine program’s success in history.”

        I am thinking you are referring to the book of Ephesians.

      • Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. August 3, 2012 at 6:30

        Thanks.

      • Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr. August 3, 2012 at 6:30

        Oh, I see. I am referring to my book He Shall Have Dominion.

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