Archives For Revelation

In Rev 16:20 we read that at the outpouring of the seventh bowl (Rev 16:17) “every island fled away, and the mountains were not found.” This is in the context of the judgment of Jerusalem, under the imagery of Babylon (Rev 16:19). But what does it mean? The dispensationalist interpretation here is rather extreme: “These […]

Continue Reading...

Dispensationalists are prone to boast that Revelation 20 presents their system in clear and certain terms. They often declare that they can go to one text of Scripture and find their system. Unfortunately, this is not the case. This text actually presents them with serious problems. Consider the following. First, the concluding period of earth […]

Continue Reading...

Preterism is largely misunderstood and feared among fundamentalists. But when you can sit down and talk with them, they often find the preterist argument hard to overthrow. In this article I will present three important arguments for the preterist analysis of certain biblical prophecies. Three factors generate preterism: (1) the importance of temporal indicators in […]

Continue Reading...

Revelation is as fascinating a book as it is a confusing one. However, 99% of the confusion is dispelled if we take seriously its own statements about when its judgments are expected to occur. These judgments are not destructive of the postmillennial hope for the historical long-run because these judgments are expected in the historical […]

Continue Reading...

The Book of Revelation is perhaps the best known prophetic work in the Bible. It is filled with war and judgment, which many use to show that Revelation undermines the optimistic postmillennial hope. Yet Revelation can only be employed against postmillennialism if it is misinterpreted. And the usual misinterpretation arises the moment one opens Revelation, […]

Continue Reading...

Contrary to popular opinion, Revelation does not undermine the postmillennial hope — despite its enormous judgments. And this is mainly because it is prophesying events to occur soon. John uses two terms when he speaks of his temporal expectation: “shortly” (Gk., en tachei) and “near” (Gk., engus). If for some reason his original audience could […]

Continue Reading...

Dr. Gentry: “You are committed to the Reformed faith, yet you don’t take the historicist approach to eschatology which was widely held among the Reformers. Why do you not follow the Reformers in this part of their theology?” G.K., Minneapolis, Minn. Gentry’s response: Thank you for your inquiry. You are correct that I am committed […]

Continue Reading...