Archives For Amillennialism

Here is a question I recently received. Perhaps you have thought the same: Good afternoon, sir. I recently read an article by you in which you referred to the label “optimistic amill.” as an oxymoron. Could you please tell me why you think that? I’d be very thankful. I am currently working through these eschetalogical […]

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Christ is coming. But he is not coming soon. This is the position of historic postmillennialism. And it runs counter to all the other evangelical eschatological positions. In my last blog article I began a brief analysis of the doctrine of the imminent return of Christ. I began setting up the matter and also showing […]

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Postmillennialism differs from dispensationalism, premillennialism, and amillennialism in being the only eschatological position that is optimistic regarding the outcome of current history. And though this is the key distinctive of postmillennialism, it differs from the other eschatological positions also in its denying that Christ could return at any moment. We believe, with the church of […]

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Amillennialists generally do not like to be classified as “pessimists.” Two leading reasons for their rejecting this designation are: (1) It is negative sounding in itself, and (2) it overlooks the fact that they argue that ultimately Christ and his people win the victory at the end of history. Some amillennialists deny this designation because they call themselves “optimistic […]

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Generally it is helpful to understand your opponent’s eschatological postion in order to better know your own. In this succinct study I will summarize the essential distinctive features of amillennialism. Until the early twentieth century the term “amillennial” did not exist. Amillennialism was subsumed under the term “postmillennialism.” But after World War I and the onset […]

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In developing a systematic eschatology we may sort out the standard evangelical viewpoints along millennial lines (though the actual question of the millennium in Rev 20 really should not be central to the discussion). In attaching prefixes to the term “millennium” we modify the second coming of Christ in terms of its connection to the […]

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According to amillennial objectors,  postmillennialism allegedly overlooks Christ’s present kingship. Prof. Robert Strimple quotes my definition of postmillennialism which observes that “increasing gospel success will gradually produce a time in history prior to Christ’s return in which faith, righteousness, peace, and prosperity will prevail in the affairs of people and of nations.” He responds by […]

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